FREE version of Journal of a Trapper by Osborne Russell

Download the free version from Google

A FREE version of Journal of a Trapper by Osborne Russell. This is a log book or a journey through time where Osborne Russell allows some insight into his travels within the Rocky Mountains as a trapper. It is a very good book to read if you want to understand the hardships people had to endure when they were first to travel to the western United States.

I have found a good link to download a copy of the “Journal of a Trapper” by Osborne Russell.

Its a live link from Google. It is the PDF version. Journal of a Trapper Nine years in the Rocky Mountains 1834 -1843 by Osborne Russell.

Download Journal of a Trapper – the free version https://ia800208.us.archive.org/31/items/journalatrapper00yorkgoog/journalatrapper00yorkgoog.pdf

Forrest Fenn read Journal of a Trapper many times.

The Journal of a Trapper had to be important. In The Thrill of the Chase under the Looking for Lewis and Clark Chapter, Forrest Fenn said:

A few years later, when I was sixteen, I read a book titled
/Journal of a Trapper by Osborne Russell, who travelled
along the Madison River in 1835, just outside of west
Yellowstone where Hebgen Lake is now. Russell, along with a few
of Jim Bridger’s trappers, was attacked by eighty Blackfeet Indians
near where Hebgen Dam would be built nearly a century later. After
a brief flght, Russell escaped west toward Stinking Creek.

When closing the Looking for Lewis and Clark chapter Forrest Fenn wrote:

Over the years I’ve read Journal of a Trapper a dozen times,
and always with a deeper appreciation for who Osborne Russell
was and what he did. The mountains continue to beckon to me.
They always will.

Although Journal of a Trapper may be a bit hard to read at times, you can find locations on a modern day map that pinpoints where Osborne Russell actually visited. As a matter of fact, on Forrest Fenn’s own website, he posts ” google Osborne Russell, google Hebgen Lake. That entry can be found HERE. Note that on July of 2019, the pages located on the resource site have changed dramatically.

BUT WAIT ! If the chapter name is “Looking for Lewis and Clark” why are we centering our attention around Osborne Russell and Hebgen Lake ? Make me wonder…

Happy Reading !

Originally Posted on March 28, 2019